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Steyr Arms C9-A1 Pistol

Saturday, September 03, 2011 - Jorge Amselle

STEYR ARMS C9-A1 PISTOL

Posted by Jorge Amselle. http://www.tactical-life.com/online/?author=299

New 9mm that straddles the line between a full-size duty pistol and concealed carry gun!

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Steyr’s C9-A1 9mm pistol has an improved and smoother trigger with a very short reset for faster follow up shots.

Performance Focused
The new C9-A1 seeks to straddle the line between a full-size duty pistol and a comfortable concealed carry or off-duty gun by combining elements of the two very successful designs—adding to the gun’s versatility. Steyr used the frame from its full-size duty pistol, with its larger magazine capacity and improved grip, and paired it with the slide and barrel from its
compact model.

The most significant new feature is the dramatically improved trigger system. The redesigned Reset Action mechanism results in an incredibly smooth two-stage trigger with an extremely light first stage, which allows for prepping of the trigger, and an extremely crisp second stage with just the slightest amount of take-up. The trigger exhibited no overtravel and a very short reset with a 5-pound trigger pull that actually feels significantly lighter.

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The limited access lock secures the pistol and retains the takedown lever.

Steyr achieved this improvement over their already good trigger by using a small roller on a crosspin that can be seen on the frame below the rear sight. This roller intersects the striker firing pin and greatly smooths its travel, which results in the super clean break of the trigger. This change does, however, eliminate the loaded chamber indicator available in previous models since it relied on the same pin. This may be a feature that is missed by some, but no amount of indicators could ever replace proper safe gun handling and actual inspection of the chamber by the user. The sights themselves are drift-adjustable and come in the traditional three-dot pattern, which American shooters are used to—two white dots in the rear and one bright red dot on the front sight. This replaces Steyr’s standard triangle/trapezoid sights, but sticking with a more recognizable sight picture makes for easier training.

... for more on this
pick up the September 2011 issue of Guns & Weapons

 

or visit www.tactical-life.com